Posts Tagged ‘Research’

VUSN to begin testing next generation device

July 19, 2016

BRISBANE, Australia and CARLSBAD, Calif., July 18, 2016 /PRNewswire/ — ImpediMed Limited (ASX:IPD) announces that it is partnering with Vanderbilt University School of Nursing for a series of patient and clinician human factors testing for the company’s next generation technology platform. Under the direction of Principal Investigator Sheila H. Ridner, PhD, FAAN, researchers at the Vanderbilt…

Study shows people with Alzheimer’s have a lower ability to detect pain but they feel it as intensely as healthy adults

July 12, 2016

People with Alzheimer’s disease don’t perceive pain as readily as healthy older adults, and this may lead to delays and underreporting of pain. This alteration in pain detection may be one reason that people with Alzheimer’s disease and pain tend to be undermedicated and suffer unnecessarily, a trans-institutional group of Vanderbilt researchers reported recently in…

Search committee for VUSN Senior Associate Dean for Research announced

June 24, 2016

Barbara A. Given, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, the Visiting Ingram Professor of Nursing at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) and university distinguished professor at the Michigan State University College of Nursing, will lead the search committee for the next senior associate dean for research for VUSN. The trans-institutional search committee will work with executive search…

Advanced Device Improves Health and Costs for Patients With Lymphedema

October 21, 2015

Lymphedema patients experienced a nearly 80% reduction in their cellulitis episodes just by using an advanced pneumatic compression device (APCD) at home, according to a study in JAMA Dermatology (2015; doi:10.1001/jamadermatol.2015.1895).

VUSN Study on Alzheimer’s to Explore Perception of Pain

October 15, 2015

Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) has been awarded a four-year $660,633 grant from the National Institute of Health’s National Institute on Aging to study how psychophysical responses to acute experimental thermal pain differ between older adults with and without Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).