Posts Tagged ‘Ken Wallston’

Ken Wallston, prominent nursing researcher and health psychology pioneer, has died

November 11, 2020

Professor of Nursing, Emeritus, Kenneth A. Wallston, PhD, MA, regarded internationally as one of the founders of health psychology, died in Asheville, North Carolina, on Oct. 27. He was 78. A faculty member at the Vanderbilt University School of Nursing for more than 40 years, Wallston worked widely in the transdisciplinary arena termed behavioral medicine….

Retiring School of Nursing faculty lauded for commitment, change and engagement

August 30, 2017

The Vanderbilt University School of Nursing (VUSN) recognized four retiring faculty members for their contributions to the school, community and profession during a recent gathering at the University Club. The four retiring professors—Marty Conrad, Bonnie Pilon, Clare Sullivan and Ken Wallston—accounted for 110 years of nursing education. Linda Norman, DSN, R.N., FAAN, the Valere Potter…

Vanderbilt honors Bonnie Pilon and Ken Wallston as Faculty Emeriti

May 15, 2017

Bonita “Bonnie” Pilon, Ph.D., NEA-BC, FAAN, and Kenneth A. Wallston, Ph.D., were recognized as faculty emeriti during Vanderbilt University’s Commencement ceremonies Friday, May 12. The two faculty members were among 32 retiring Vanderbilt professors honored for their years of service and scholarship. Pilon, who joined Vanderbilt University School of Nursing in 1989, was named professor…

Development and Initial Testing of the FLOW Instrument, a Novel Assessment of Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Men

May 1, 2017

VUSN’s Ken Wallston was part of a research team to develop a method of assessing lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) regardless of literacy/numeracy.

Validating Health Literacy and Numeracy Measures in Minority Groups

April 21, 2017

VUSN’s Ken Wallston participated in the research validation studies of existing health literacy or numeracy tools among racial/ethnic minorities.

Study examines routine screening for health literacy

January 30, 2014

Research conducted at Vanderbilt University Medical Center shows that routine administration of the Brief Health Literacy Screen (BHLS) by nurses provides a valid measure for large-scale studies of the influence of health literacy on clinical outcomes. The BHLS poses three related questions to adult patients: How confident are you filling out medical forms by yourself? How often…